When Rooting for the Underdog Pays Off

For those of you who don’t know Augusten Burroughs, take a gander at Running With Scissors or Wolf At the Table whenever you are feeling like a giant pile of poop.
His childhood (and adulthood) will remind you of why your life is perfect!

Lust and Wonder

This is a memoir (another!) of his adulthood post sobriety, though the early few pages are still him immersed in a relapse.
This memoir chronicles three very important relationships he had as an adult, including both of his marriages.


If you are familiar with him, you will appreciate his ongoing sense of humor in his writing- about his mental illness, his catastrophizing, his impulsive jewelry buying.
What is new is the love story that this memoir produces.
You’ve always rooted for him given the horrible life he’s had, and this book gives you a chance to celebrate what he’s done with it.

20170418_231919.jpg

On top of it, he mentions that one of his therapists looks like Joyce Carol Oates from the 70s. He mentions her numerous times, and gets her style. Love him even more now.

My husband and I were lucky enough to meet him at a recent book signing and hear him read an excerpt from the beginning of the book- where he is visiting a therapist regarding his lack of sexual feelings towards his boyfriend. He’s as hilarious in person as he is on the pages. He’s also WAY MORE philosophical in person, though this excerpt is pretty amazing:

“Diamonds appeared oily upon magnification. Rubies were busy inside. Sapphires sometimes appeared to contain a galaxy, and emeralds could blind you with green. Opals reminded me of a beehive. Sometimes jade looked like sticky rice, and inside some alexandrites, it appeared to be raining. 

Was it a universal truth that the closer you looked at something, the more you would see but the less you would understand what you were looking at?”

Amazing.

 

When What You Read Feels Like a Dream…

The Night Circus by Erin Morgenstern was like a dream and a fairy tale for adults (I think it even says that on the back). How someone can take such short, simple sentences and turn them into mental images of such grandeur and mystery and beauty blows my mind. Morgenstern isn’t a lyrical author, but she is a painter with words.

The Night Circus

The story is of Marco and Celia, two illusionists. Both are raised from children to understand that their illusions are part of a contest of which they know no rules. The contest eventually involves a magical, surreal circus that captivates the places it visits- and captivates the people that visit. Once Marco and Celia meet and realize that they are opponents, the fate of their lives, the circus and the performers is a jeopardy.

The novel begins in the Victorian era and it has a very steampunk feel to it. I could see some cosplay come out of this. I read it and thought what a great movie or TV series this would be (if Hollywood can meet/exceed reader expectations), but alas, there isn’t yet one despite the screenplay having been sold in 2012. Surprisingly (or maybe I missed it?) there is no mention of the turn of the century despite this story crossing over into the 20th century. I thought there could have been something extraordinary about this change included with the circus, but there was not.

Morgenstern attempts to create two time lines- a current one with a young circus-goer named Bailey and a past one that creates the backstory of the circus and the contest. You realize that the two will intersect towards the end of the book, but I didn’t feel it was that necessary, as it wasn’t until the last 1/3 of the book that I even realized they were on different paths. Bailey’s relationship to the circus doesn’t become exposed until the end, and even then it is not made totally clear. One interesting note- the author RARELY uses the word magic to describe anything in the book. If the word is used, it seems as if it is a dirty word.

Beautiful story about love, relationships, death, illusions and whether our paths in life are truly ordained before we exist.

My Non-Hyperbole about Hyperbole and a Half

Just finished this today and had to share my thoughts immediately.
Wow.
What an amazing book and she is an amazing writer and person.
Prior to reading this, I had heard of the cartoon Hyperbole and a Half, and knew there was a blog associated with it, but I never checked it out. I had only really seen the random memes that showed up on FB.
I had also heard a little scuttle about the author, Allie Brosh, especially when the blog stopped producing new stuff.
20170408_144106
 
Turns out Allie is a scientist by trade, but a cartoonist and memoirist at heart. She has crippling bouts of depression, and expresses them BEAUTIFULLY here. The stories are hilarious, moving, captivating, and hilarious again. She writes a lot about her mom, her (crazy/stupid) dogs, and her battle with depression. All while being brutally and hilarious and sweary (which of course endears her to me).
 
I am lucky, and have never personally experienced depression like this, but I know people who have (maybe not even this bad, Allie’s is serious business). She even details about how she wanted to end her life, and knew she needed to tell someone that, but had NO idea how to start that conversation without becoming the soother instead of the soothee….I’d never even thought about that- she makes it crystal clear. Of dying she says she never wanted to kill herself, she just wanted her life to end. The CRAZY thing is that Augusten Burroughs almost said the exact same thing word for word last night at the reading we went to!
 
Read it. It’s thick, but super quick since it is a graphic novel. Fills the graphic novel box if you’re doing a book challenge. HIGHLY recommend this. If the depression talk is a trigger, then just read the mom and dog sections. FREAKING. HILARIOUS.